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A fine cambiata voice
This is one of the finest examples of a cambiata voice I have come across in recent times. Inigo Byrne was a former cathedral chorister who left the choir at the time his voice was entering the early stages of change. His singing coach for this professional recording pitched the Mozart Ave Verum, not in its normal key of D major, but a fourth down in A major. This was not a deliberate attempt to be cambiata - but simply the correct pitch to get the best from the voice. This illustrates perfectly the principle that in cambiata singing, the song must fit the voice, not the voice the song. The second extract is the opening of the Enya song May it Be from Lord of the Rings. It's included because it captures the resonance of the cambiata tone that would be missing were the singer to be struggling to retain his treble voice. It was partly on the strength of this album, My World, (Belerion label) that we chose Inigo to feature in the Boys Keep Singing film Riding the Changes.

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Swan Song
Three short clips in which two thirteen year old boys perform the treble duet from Greene's Lord, Let Me Know Mine End. The first is as it would have been heard at cathedral evensong. The second is the dry studio recording of the lower voice only (the "evensong" was virtual - the second voice was dubbed on and the two boys never met each other!). In this recording it is clear that the lower voice is in stage 3 of change. Although singing treble, the boy isn't really a treble any more. You can hear a clear passagio point on the E5 on the word "tell". This would be unlikely in an unchanged voice. The final clip is the folk song Waly Waly, which was recorded at the same time, but pitched down in the cambiata range. The boy (and his mother) was surprised by the resonance of the new voice that is sitting under the old treble here, but many English trebles never experience this, continuing in falsetto until they stop singing.

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Trained and untrained boys' voices
The first performance of this folk song is by a primary school boys' choir. The second is by trained cathedral choristers. A key point to note is that the primary school boys have unchanged voices, whereas the choristers, who on average are two years older, will have voices that have begun to change.

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Voice Change in the National Youth Choir of Scotland
Boys from the National Boys Choir of Scotland, part of the National Youth Choir of Scotland, demonstrate the different stages of voice change in speaking and singing. used with kind permission.

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Preview
Boyes are apt to change their voices at fourteene yeares of age
The Wulstan Atkins Memorial Lecture, Three Choirs Festival, Worcester 2011

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This list was generated on Sun Dec 16 03:29:24 2018 UTC.